10.03.2017

Eucalpytus Breathe-Easier Salve

Eucalyptus Breathe-Easier Salve

  • Apply a small amount on the bottom of both feet at bedtime or as needed

  • Ingredients: Natural oils & butters, eucalyptus essential oil 

Eucalyptus: What are the health benefits?

Chinese, Indian Ayurvedic, Greek, and European medicine have used eucalyptus for thousands of years. Eucalyptus is a fast-growing evergreen tree native to Australia. 

Eucalyptus essential oil is effective for treating respiratory problems including cold, cough, running nose, sore throat, asthma, nasal congestion, bronchitis, and sinusitis. Eucalyptus oil is antibacterial, anti-fungal, antimicrobial, antiviral, anti-inflammatory and decongestant in nature. A study published in 2004 shows its usefulness in treating nonbacterial sinusitis. Eucalyptus oil may have antibacterial effects on pathogenic bacteria in the upper respiratory tract, including Haemophilus influenzae and some strains of streptococcus.


Annisquam Herb Farm

9.30.2017

Gift Box of All Natural Salves

Gift Box

All natural ingredients
  • Lavender Soothing Salve
  • Sunscreen approx. SPF 30
  • Magnesium Salts Lotion

Magnesium Oil

Magnesium Oil

Spray a small amount to the bottom of each foot at bedtime daily.
  • All natural ingredients: Magnesium flakes & distiller water
  • In a Gift Box

Benefits of Transdermal Magnesium
Transdermal magnesium is a powerful tool in the battle against magnesium deficiency.
Benefits reported by those who use transdermal applications of magnesium relate specifically to its therapeutic application on the skin and its direct absorption into the cells:
  • Increased sleep
  • Reduced muscle aches, pains, cramping, restless leg syndrome and spasms
  • Healthy skin and reduced outbreaks of eczema and psoriasis
  • Better relaxation and stress management
  • Increased energy levels and improved moods
  • Increased athletic performance

Talc-less Powder & Healing Salve #1

Talc-less Powder & Healing Salve #1


  • All natural ingredients
  • Reusable shaker and powder refill
  • Healing Salve for insect bites, itchy or dry skin
  • In a gift box



Magnesium Salts Lotion

Magnesium Salts Lotion

Apply a small amount to the bottom of each foot at bedtime daily.

Benefits of Transdermal Magnesium
Transdermal magnesium is a powerful tool in the battle against magnesium deficiency.
Benefits reported by those who use transdermal applications of magnesium relate specifically to its therapeutic application on the skin and its direct absorption into the cells:
  • Increased sleep
  • Reduced muscle aches, pains, cramping, restless leg syndrome and spasms
  • Healthy skin and reduced outbreaks of eczema and psoriasis
  • Better relaxation and stress management
  • Increased energy levels and improved moods
  • Increased athletic performance

Oatmeal & Chamomile Soap

Gift Box

Oatmeal & Chamomile Soap

Natural oils infused with chamomile, Shea butter, Oatmeal, White kaolin clay
Hand-knit 100% cotton washcloth

Baby Soft Carrot & Buttermilk Soap

Gift Box

Baby Soft Carrot & Buttermilk Soap

Natural oils, Buttermilk, Carrot, Carrot root oil
Two hand-knit 100% cotton washcloth

8.23.2017

Timing is Everything!

Plant Propagation Calendar - What You Should Be Doing Now
Last Updated: April 30, 2015   |   by Mike McGroarty

January-Mid Winter
You can do hardwood cuttings of deciduous plants. Just wait for a day when the ground is not frozen so you can either plant them out, or bury them as described in the section on hardwood cuttings. You can also do hardwood cuttings of evergreens, if you can provide them with some bottom heat. If you are going to do any grafting, now is the time to bring in your rootstock and let them warm up so they can begin to break dormancy.

February-Mid to Late Winter
You can still do hardwood cuttings as described for January. Start your grafting toward the middle or end of the month.

March-Late Winter, Early Spring
It’s a little late for hardwood cuttings of evergreens, but you can still do some hardwood cuttings of deciduous plants. As soon as the ground thaws and spring begins to peak around the corner you can start doing plants that can be propagated by division. You can also start to do some layering. If you have landscape plants that need pruning, do it now before they begin to grow. Even if it means losing the flower buds, if the plant needs trimming it should be done in order to develop an attractive plant. Any transplanting that you intend to do should be done now before the plants break dormancy.

April-Early Spring
There are plenty of things to do in April. You can still do some division as long as the plants are not too far out of dormancy. You can do layering and serpentine layering. If you have seeds that you have been stratifying, you can plant them out as long as they have been in stratification for the proper length of time.

May-Mid Spring
You can continue all methods of layering. All seeds should now be ready to plant out. You can also collect seeds that ripen in the spring. By the end of the month you should be able to start some softwood cuttings, unless you are in a northern state.

June-Late Spring, Early Summer
By now you should be able to do softwood cuttings of just about all deciduous plants. If you are going to do softwood cuttings of Rhododendrons, try some early in June. If they don’t do well, try a few more later in the month. If you are using intermittent mist you can experiment with all kinds of different plants. June is a little early to be doing softwood cuttings of evergreens but you can test a few.

July-Mid Summer
Continue with softwood cuttings of deciduous plants. Now is the time to start some softwood cuttings of evergreens. By mid to late July you can start budding dogwoods, apples, crab apples, cherries, and anything else you would like to bud.

August-Mid to Late Summer
Continue with softwood cuttings of evergreens. By now the wood of most deciduous plants has hardened off. You can still make cuttings with this harder wood if you are using intermittent mist, but you should use a little stronger concentration of rooting compound. Budding can be done early in August.

September-Late Summer, Early Fall
Start watching for fall seeds to ripen and start collecting them. Evergreen cuttings can still be taken and rooted under intermittent mist. If you are not using mist you can stick them in a bed of sand and keep them watered.

October-Fall
Hardwood cuttings of evergreens can be stuck in a bed of sand. Or you can start sticking hardwood cuttings of evergreens using bottom heat. After a good hard frost you can start dividing perennials. Collect pines cones from Pines, Spruce, and Firs, as the cones open they release the seeds inside. Store the seeds in a cool dry place until spring for plantings. Seed pods from Rhododendrons and Deciduous Azaleas can also be collected.

November-Late Fall
Hardwood cuttings of evergreens can be stuck either in a bed of sand outdoors or indoors with bottom heat. Hardwood cuttings of deciduous plants can be done by either of the methods mentioned in the section on hardwood cuttings. If you intend to do some grafting over the winter, now is the time to make sure your rootstock is potted up and placed in a protected, but cold area until January.

December-Early Winter
You can do hardwood cuttings of evergreens in a bed of sand or with bottom heat. You can also do hardwood cuttings of deciduous plants as long as the ground is not frozen.

8.19.2017

Pickles for a Non-Pickle-Lover

Not being a pickle lover, I had never tried pickling cucumbers. 

I do remember having the first dill pickles I liked on a farm in Washington state prepared by a wonderful woman originally from Latvia.

Once the cucumbers started to come on the vines I gave a Refrigerator recipe a try. It made a very tasty, crunchy pickle which has a thumbs-up from the pickle eaters here!

Refrigerator Dill Pickles

"These pickles taste so fresh and have just the right amount of dill and garlic. They taste great along-side a hotdog on a bun. They also taste great alone as a healthy snack. The pickles should be good for 6 weeks. Enjoy! You can also cut cucumbers into chips if you prefer a pickle chip instead of a spear."
Ingredients
  • 3 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/4 cups white vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon sea salt
  • 4 cups cucumber spears
  • 2 cloves garlic, whole
  • 2 heads fresh dill

Directions


  1. Stir water, vinegar, sugar, and sea salt together in a saucepan over high heat. Bring to a boil; remove from heat and cool completely.
  2. Combine cucumber spears, garlic cloves, and fresh dill in a large glass or plastic container. Pour cooled vinegar mixture over cucumber mixture. Seal container with lid and refrigerate for at least 3 days.

Not being a pickle lover, I had never tried pickling cucumbers. 

I do remember having the first dill pickles I liked on a farm in Washington state prepared by a wonderful woman originally from Latvia.

Once the cucumbers started to come on the vines I gave a Refrigerator recipe a try. It made a very tasty, crunchy pickle which has a thumbs-up from the pickle eaters here!

Refrigerator Dill Pickles

"These pickles taste so fresh and have just the right amount of dill and garlic. They taste great along-side a hotdog on a bun. They also taste great alone as a healthy snack. The pickles should be good for 6 weeks. Enjoy! You can also cut cucumbers into chips if you prefer a pickle chip instead of a spear."
Ingredients
  • 3 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/4 cups white vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon sea salt
  • 4 cups cucumber spears
  • 2 cloves garlic, whole
  • 2 heads fresh dill

Directions


  1. Stir water, vinegar, sugar, and sea salt together in a saucepan over high heat. Bring to a boil; remove from heat and cool completely.
  2. Combine cucumber spears, garlic cloves, and fresh dill in a large glass or plastic container. Pour cooled vinegar mixture over cucumber mixture. Seal container with lid and refrigerate for at least 3 days.

Not being a pickle lover, I had never tried pickling cucumbers. 

I do remember having the first dill pickles I liked on a farm in Washington state prepared by a wonderful woman originally from Latvia.

Once the cucumbers started to come on the vines I gave a Refrigerator recipe a try. It made a very tasty, crunchy pickle which has a thumbs-up from the pickle eaters here!

Refrigerator Dill Pickles

"These pickles taste so fresh and have just the right amount of dill and garlic. They taste great along-side a hotdog on a bun. They also taste great alone as a healthy snack. The pickles should be good for 6 weeks. Enjoy! You can also cut cucumbers into chips if you prefer a pickle chip instead of a spear."
Ingredients
  • 3 1/2 cups water
  • 1 1/4 cups white vinegar
  • 1 tablespoon sugar
  • 1 tablespoon sea salt
  • 4 cups cucumber spears
  • 2 cloves garlic, whole
  • 2 heads fresh dill

Directions


  1. Stir water, vinegar, sugar, and sea salt together in a saucepan over high heat. Bring to a boil; remove from heat and cool completely.
  2. Combine cucumber spears, garlic cloves, and fresh dill in a large glass or plastic container. Pour cooled vinegar mixture over cucumber mixture. Seal container with lid and refrigerate for at least 3 days.

5.09.2017

Prepared Horseradish at the ASC Plant & Gourmet Food Sale

Organically pampered Horseradish Root, organic apple cider vinegar and a touch of sea salt - that is all there is

Horseradish Sauce Recipe

Ingredients
  • 3 Tbsp prepared horseradish
  • 1/4 cup sour cream
  • 1 teaspoon of your favorite mustard
  • 1 Tbsp mayonnaise
  • 1 Tbsp chives or the tops of a green onion, chopped
Directions
Mix all ingredients together
Makes about 1/2 a cup

Serve as a sauce for steak, pork, on eggs, on cheese and crackers as an appetizer.